WHY YOU MUST TAKE VITAMIN B DURING YOUR PREGNANCY

{Gettyimages}

The entire B complex of eight vitamins plays a crucial role in your strength and health while your baby is developing. During your first and third trimesters, most women feel more tired and run down than usual.

Even though the B complex can come in great supplements, the best way to absorb these nutrients is through vitamin-rich foods!

Vitamin B rich foods help boost your natural energy with these nourishing vitamins for your growing baby. Take a look at the roles and benefits of all the B vitamins and find out how to get enough of each to ensure a happy, healthy pregnancy.

Vitamin B1: Thiamine

Since Thiamine plays a major role in the development of your baby’s brain, aim to consume 1.4 mg every day. Below are natural sources of vitamin B1, so incorporate these foods into your diet to keep your baby’s brain development on track.

Natural Food Sources of Vitamin B1:
Peas
Oats
Pork
Lentils
Pecans
Salmon
Brazil Nuts
Dried Beans
Wheat Germ
Nutritional Yeast
Whole Grain Pasta
Fortified breads or Cereals
Vitamin B2: Riboflavin

Riboflavin is essential for good eye health and it has the added benefit of giving your skin a fresh, healthy glow skin. 

As with all B vitamins, riboflavin is water soluble and therefore not stored in your body; this means you need to get a good, healthy dosage of around 1.4 mg each day when pregnant compared to the usual 1.1 mg for non-pregnant women.

Natural Food Sources of Vitamin B2:
Almonds (roasted is an excellent source)
Sweet Potatoes
Carrots
Oats
Peas
Tempeh
Broccoli
Spinach
Fenugreek
Asparagus
Mushrooms
Whole Grains
Nutritional Yeast
Fortified Cereals
Brussel Sprouts
Cheese: cottage and ricotta
Milk
Eggs
Natural Yogurt
Wild Salmon (highest concentration of B2 found in animal sources)
Pork, Chicken, Beef (Liver and Kidney offer high amounts)

Vitamin B3: Niacin

Vitamin B-3 has a whole host of benefits for your body; it can improve digestion, reduce nausea and take the edge off debilitating migraines. Aim for around 18 mg every day.

Natural Food Sources of Vitamin B3:
Turkey
Venison
Wild Salmon
Chicken Breast
Peanuts
Crimini Mushrooms
Liver
Tuna
Peas
Tahini
Kidney Beans
Grass-fed Beef
Sunflower Seeds
Avocados
Asparagus
Tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Sweet Potato
Brown Rice

Vitamin B5: Pantothenic Acid

Pregnancy can do some strange and frustrating things to our bodies, one of which is painful leg cramps. Luckily, vitamin B5 can help to ease these cramps, so aim to consume 6 mg every day. It also has the added benefit of producing important pregnancy hormones.

Natural Food Sources of Vitamin B5:
Sunflower Seeds
Sweet Potato
Avocado
Whole Grains or Fortified Cereals
Crimini Mushrooms
Oats
Organic Corn
Cauliflower
Wild Salmon
Chicken Breast
Milk
Oranges
Bananas
Sun-dried Tomatoes
Trail Mix (Seeds, Nuts and Chocolate Chips)

Vitamin B6: Pyridoxine

Pyridoxine is vital for the development of your baby’s nervous system and brain throughout each week of your pregnancy, but it has some beneficial side effects for you, too.

Natural Food Sources of Vitamin B6:
Garlic
Beans
Sweet Potatoes
Chickpeas
Avocados
Hazelnuts
Sunflower Seeds
Brown Rice
Prune Juice
Spinach
Bananas
Papayas
Chicken
Pork Loin
Wild Salmon
Turkey
Grass-fed Beef
Safe-Catch Elite Tuna


Vitamin B9: Folic Acid

It’s fairly common knowledge that folic acid is one of the most important B vitamins to take during pregnancy and for a very good reason. The proper amount of folic acid reduces the risk of your baby developing neural tube birth defects like spina bifida. It’s also responsible for helping to produce red blood cells which are obviously important for both you and your growing baby.

You should be consuming 400 – 800 mcg (micrograms) of vitamin B9 every day throughout your entire pregnancy, which translates to 0.4 – 0.8 mg (milligrams). If you’re trying to conceive it’s also recommended that you consume this same amount of folic acid (400 mcg pre-pregnancy is generally fine) to maximize your chances of getting pregnant.

On top of this, try to increase your consumption of foods which naturally contain the vitamin.

Folic Acid Dosages Breakdown
400 mcg (0.4 mg) a day if you are trying to conceive
400 – 800 mcg (0.4 – 0.8 mg) a day during pregnancy
Not to exceed 1000 mcg (1.0 mg) per day during pregnancy

Natural Food Sources of Vitamin B9:
Lentils
Spinach
Great Northern Beans
Fortified Cereals
Asparagus
Avocado
Peas
Nuts
Dried Beans
Egg Noodles
Beef Liver
Sprouts

What Vitamin B9 Aids In Pregnancy
Prevents NTDs (neural tube defects) like anencephaly (a brain defect) or spina bifida (spinal cord defect). NTDs can develop at the earliest stage of pregnancy, so it is important to be consuming folic acid from the time you start trying to conceive.
Reduces risk of birth defects like cleft lip, cleft palate, some heart defects
Reduces the risk of preeclampsia during pregnancy
Important for the growth of the placenta, synthesis of DNA and the development of the baby
Essential for red blood cell production and helps prevent forms of anemia. 

Vitamin B Roles For Pregnancy Cheat Sheet

Here’s a handy cheat sheet to help you remember exactly how each B vitamin can support you and your growing baby throughout pregnancy.

B-1 (Thiamine): 1.4 mg – Supports baby’s healthy brain development
B-2 (Riboflavin): 1.4 mg – Keeps eyes healthy and skin glowing
B-3 (Niacin): 18 mg – Eases morning sickness, keeps nausea at bay and improves digestion
B-5 (Pantothenic Acid): 6 mg – Reduces leg cramps and helps produce essential pregnancy hormones
B-6 (Pyridoxine): 25 – 50 mg – Aids the development of baby’s nervous system and brain (don’t exceed 100 mg)
B-7 (Biotin): 30 mcg – Deficiency is often caused by pregnancy, so increased consumption is vital
B-9 (Folic Acid): 400 – 800 mcg – Plays a huge role in reducing the risk of birth defects (don’t exceed 1000 mcg)
B-12 (Cobalamin): 2.6 mcg – Maintains and supports the development of you and your baby’s nervous system. 

Syndicated from Americanpregnancyassociation.

@Clinicgists 

Post a Comment

0 Comments